Everything You Need to Know About Subutex and Xanax

WHAT IS SUBUTEX AND WHAT DOES IT DO?


Subutex is a brand name for Buprenorphine, which is a medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat opioid use disorder (OUD) as medication-assisted treatment (MAT). However, unlike Suboxone, which is also a brand name for Buprenorphine, Subutex does not contain Naloxone.


The main purpose of Subutex is to be an opioid partial agonist. What this means is that it produces effects such as euphoria at a very low degree to diminish the effects of physical dependence on opioids, such as withdrawal symptoms and cravings.


WHAT IS THE CORRECT WAY TO TAKE SUBUTEX?


Subutex is the best medication to use when beginning treatment for opioid addiction since this is the period when withdrawal symptoms are at their worst. This is because Subutex does not contain Naloxone, which is known to make withdrawal symptoms worse.


Generally, Subutex is administered in a clinical setting like a recovery center. The right way to take it would be with the assistance and supervision of the medical personnel in these recovery centers. It is often administered sublingually, although it could also be injected monthly or administered through implants.

IS SUBUTEX ADDICTIVE?


Since the Buprenorphine in Subutex acts similarly to the way an opioid does in the body, it can make people high. Pair this information with the fact that Subutex does not have Naloxone which acts as a blocker to prevent the feeling of getting high, and it follows that Subutex can be addictive and subsequently abused.


WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF SUBUTEX?


Common side effects of Subutex include:

  • Constipation, headache, nausea, and vomiting

  • Dizziness

  • Drowsiness and fatigue

  • Sweating

  • Dry mouth

  • Muscle aches and cramps

  • Inability to sleep

  • Fever

  • Blurred vision or dilated pupils

  • Tremors

  • Palpitations

  • Disturbance in attention

More serious side effects of Subutex include:

  • Respiratory distress

  • Overdose

  • Adrenal insufficiency

  • Dependence

  • Withdrawal

  • Itching, pain, swelling, and nerve damage (implant)

  • Pain at injection site (injection)

  • Neonatal abstinence syndrome (in newborns)


It is worth noting again that Subutex does have a similar effect as other opioids, albeit a lot weaker. Because of this, there is still a potential risk of overdosing on it.


HOW LONG DO SUBUTEX SIDE EFFECTS LAST?


There is no definite timetable for this, since the duration the side effects of Subutex last depends greatly on the severity of these side effects. For most common side effects, they may last anywhere from several minutes to hours, to a day. For the more serious side effects, the impairment may last a lot longer.


WHY WAS SUBUTEX DISCONTINUED?


Subutex was discontinued in 2011 because of its tendency to be abused. Many people exploited Subutex by crushing and snorting the tablets or injecting them to achieve a more powerful effect. This was dangerous because when Subutex is injected intravenously or snorted at large doses, it can suppress breathing, cause dizziness, confusion, or unconsciousness. The risk this posed prompted its discontinuation.


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WHAT IS XANAX AND WHAT DOES IT DO?


Xanax is a brand name for Alprazolam, which is a medication used to treat the panic and anxiety symptoms associated with panic disorder. Alprazolam acts on the central nervous system to produce a calming effect. It does this by enhancing the effect of a certain natural chemical in the body called GABA.


WHAT IS THE CORRECT WAY TO TAKE XANAX?


First and foremost, the Medication Guide the pharmacist provides should be read before alprazolam is taken for the first time, and every time it is refilled. Brands and indications can change over time. The doctor or pharmacist should be asked about any lingering questions.


Xanax is taken by mouth as directed by a doctor, usually once daily in the morning. It is best to avoid taking it with a high-fat meal because doing so can increase the risk of side effects. Extended-release tablets should not be crushed or chewed because doing so can release all of the drugs at once, also increasing the risk of side effects. The tablets shouldn’t be split unless they have a score line and the doctor or pharmacist has expressly said to do so. Finally, the dosage is based on medical condition, age, and response to treatment, but the dose may be gradually increased until the drug starts working well.


Again, always be sure to follow the doctor's instructions closely to reduce the risk of side effects.


IS XANAX ADDICTIVE?


Although by itself, Xanax is classified as a Schedule IV controlled substance, meaning it is considered to have a low potential for abuse, thousands of people still seek treatment for addiction to this drug every year.


Most of the time, the people who end up abusing Xanax are people who are using it to treat their anxiety disorders. Even when used in medically approved ways, dependency can still occur because of tolerance. When taking a certain medication like Xanax, people can build up a tolerance that would render the drug ineffective unless taken in higher dosages. This leads to dependence since once a person doesn’t get enough of the drug, undesirable symptoms occur and people want to get rid of them immediately.


https://americanaddictioncenters.org/xanax-treatment/how-addictive


WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF XANAX?


Common side effects of Xanax include:

  • Drowsiness

  • Tiredness

  • Dizziness

  • Sleep problems (insomnia)

  • Memory problems

  • Poor balance or coordination

  • Slurred speech

  • Trouble concentrating

  • Irritability

  • Diarrhea

  • Constipation

  • Increased sweating

  • Headache

  • Nausea

  • Vomiting

  • Upset stomach

  • Blurred vision

  • Appetite or weight changes

  • Swelling in the hands or feet

  • Muscle weakness

  • Dry mouth

  • Stuffy nose

  • Loss of interest in sex


Additionally, there is a risk of overdosing on Xanax as people who abuse it tend to take more and more doses of it gradually as their tolerance increases.


CAN XANAX MESS UP YOUR BRAIN?


Xanax, in itself, does not mess up your brain. It is a drug that is used to treat panic and anxiety symptoms, so for people suffering from these conditions, it provides a lot of benefits. However, once it is misused, paired with other substances, taken more often, or in larger quantities than intended, it can mess up brain chemistry.


GET THE RIGHT HELP FOR SUBUTEX AND XANAX ABUSE


Subutex and Xanax are substances that were made to help people cope with recovering from past substance abuse or help treat panic disorder. However, they can also be a source of abuse and drug dependency. Should you, or someone you know find themselves misusing these medications, Recovery Blvd can provide aid and the appropriate treatments for you.


Our high-quality services and procedures include:

  1. Advanced Relapse Prevention;

  2. Substance Abuse Counseling; and

  3. Recovery Crossfit

With us, you can take the first step on the road to recovery with just the right help and care.


If you would like to know more about Recovery Blvd, please call us at (866) 231-3007. You can also visit our drug rehab center in Gresham at 1316 SE 12th Avenue, Portland, OR 97214, to book an appointment.



Disclaimer: This post serves a strictly educational use. It does not necessarily reflect the services, products, or therapeutic approaches of this establishment or its healthcare practitioners. The purpose of this blog is not to advertise the products, services, or therapeutic approaches of any other establishment that may be associated with this site. On the subject of safe or legal services, products, and appropriate therapies, recommendations ought to be given by a qualified professional on a case to case basis.

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